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ISLAS DEL ROSARIO

More commonly known as the Rosario Islands, the Rosario and San Bernardo National Natural Park is a protected area located on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. It encompasses a vast marine area off the coasts of the departments of Bolívar and Sucre, covering an approximate area of 120,000 hectares within the jurisdiction of the Tourist and Cultural District (D.T. and C.) of Cartagena de Indias.

Islas del
Rosario

More commonly known as the Rosario Islands, the Rosario and San Bernardo National Natural Park is a protected area located on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. It encompasses a vast marine area off the coasts of the departments of Bolívar and Sucre, covering an approximate area of 120,000 hectares within the jurisdiction of the Tourist and Cultural District (D.T. and C.) of Cartagena de Indias.

Islas del
Rosario

The Park begins 23 km south of the city of Cartagena de Indias in the Punta Gigante area in the district of Barú. In the southern zone, it is located in the lower Windward area in the San Bernardo Archipelago sector, 35 km northeast of the city of Santiago de Tolú. The Los Corales del Rosario and San Bernardo National Natural Park constitute a valuable underwater collection of ecosystems with the highest productivity and biodiversity, forming the largest coral platform in the continental Colombian Caribbean (about 420 km2).

Islas del
Rosario

The Park begins 23 km south of the city of Cartagena de Indias in the Punta Gigante area in the district of Barú. In the southern zone, it is located in the lower Windward area in the San Bernardo Archipelago sector, 35 km northeast of the city of Santiago de Tolú. The Los Corales del Rosario and San Bernardo National Natural Park constitute a valuable underwater collection of ecosystems with the highest productivity and biodiversity, forming the largest coral platform in the continental Colombian Caribbean (about 420 km2).

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There, you can find the most important continental reef formations in the country, unique examples of coastal mangrove forests, extensive seagrass meadows that border the islands, a diversity of invertebrates, and a multitude of colorful reef fish. The identity and significance of this protected area, at the local, regional, national, and global levels, are based on its ecosystem functions and essential ecological processes, considering that its complex structure buffers natural disturbances.

It functions as a coral barrier that mitigates the impact of coastal erosion, is the habitat of commercially valuable fish and invertebrates, offers beautiful and attractive landscapes that promote ecotourism, allowing for the sociocultural development of the communities settled in the area of influence, facilitates environmental education and awareness, and provides opportunities for marine science research.

TIPS FOR ENJOYING
YOUR STAY or DAY TRIP

  • Don't forget to pack your sunscreen, hats, sunglasses, swimwear, and other essentials for a day by the sea.
  • If you're going on our DAY TRIP, remember to bring a towel.
  • Bring enough cash for payment of additional activities, which are mostly operated by the local community of Isla Grande and do not accept credit cards.
  • If you're staying at the hotel, a mosquito repellent can be useful at certain times of the year.
  • Upon arrival at the pier, don't be confused by the vendors outside. Head directly to gate number 4; we'll be waiting for you.
  • At the counter, let us know if you have back problems, are pregnant, or have any physical conditions so we can seat you accordingly.
  • Water shoes might come in handy for the sea. Wear comfortable clothing and footwear to explore easily and fully enjoy your outdoor adventure.
  • Practice 'No Trace Hiking': carry all your trash with you until you can dispose of it properly.
  • Take a moment to disconnect and simply enjoy the surrounding nature, breathe in the fresh air, and be present.
  • Practice earthing by placing your bare feet on the sand of our beach and absorb free electrons through physical contact with the Earth's surface.